Get Up! Stand Up! Show Up! for NAIDOC week 2022

Get Up! Stand Up! Show Up! for NAIDOC week 2022

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This year Tweddle will be observing and celebrating NAIDOC Week (3rd-10th July 2022). The NAIDOC 2022 theme is Get Up! Stand Up! Show Up!

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have a proud history of getting up, standing up, and showing up. From the frontier wars and the earliest resistance fighters to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities fighting for change today.

To Get Up! Stand Up! Show Up! is a call for systemic change, whether it’s seeking proper environmental, cultural and heritage protections, Constitutional change, a comprehensive process of truth-telling, working towards treaties, or calling out racism—we must do it together.

It must be a genuine commitment by all of us to Get Up! Stand Up! Show Up! and support and secure institutional, structural, collaborative, and cooperative reforms.

It’s also time to celebrate the many who have driven and led change in Aboriginal communities over generations—they have been the heroes and champions of change, of equal rights and even basic human rights.

Getting Up, Standing Up, and Showing Up can take many forms. Together, we need to move beyond just acknowledgement, good intentions, empty words and promises, and hollow commitments.

The relationship between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non‑Indigenous Australians needs to be based on justice, equity, and the proper recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ rights.

Intergenerational ill-health has impacted generations of Aboriginal families who continue to experience trauma linked to colonisation, stolen generations, discrimination and healthcare delivered through a western lens.

Proud Gunditjmara woman and Tweddle Board Member Annette Vickery spoke on the Infant Mental Health Awareness Week event panel about the importance of connection to Country, connection to Culture and connection to Community for Aboriginal families and the services that care for them. A broad community of kinship supports should be called upon to care for family.

Tweddle has the privilege to work alongside Aboriginal health workers, mums, dads, babies and toddlers as part of our early parenting support programs.

Tweddle believes in the rights of Aboriginal People to have opportunities for self-determination. Tweddle believes in working in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities as we develop an understanding of transgenerational trauma.

We respect Aboriginal people by supporting them to stay connected to Country, to family, to language and to land.

NAIDOC Origins

NAIDOC stands for National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee. Its origins can be traced to the emergence of Aboriginal groups in the 1920′s which sought to increase awareness in the wider community of the status and treatment of Indigenous Australians.

Tweddle Reconciliation Journey

Tweddle was honoured to join the reconciliation movement with the launch of our Reflect – Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) endorsed by Reconciliation Australia.

Tweddle is now embarking on our RAP Innovate. Tweddle believes in working in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in order to develop an understanding of transgenerational trauma impacts. This is important to us because we believe in delivering inclusive practice and programs in the best interest of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies, children, and families.

As part of Tweddle’s RAP journey, we commissioned Dixon Patten, proud Yorta Yorta and Gunnai man and Director/Graphic Artist at Bayila Creative to illustrate our Tweddle RAP Reflect. The artwork tells the story of Tweddle’s commitment to Reconciliation with the Aboriginal community.

Tweddle’s Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) program provides a framework that will enable us to support the national reconciliation movement. Tweddle’s vision for reconciliation is that all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies and children in Victoria grow up in a secure environment, supported by strong families with a cultural connection to community. As a health service, we want to play our part in Healing Country.

We acknowledge that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are proud, and as a proud community, they teach us the power of standing up for the rights of their children, rights to their land and their rights to access services.

You can read more about NAIDOC Week and get involved here.

This Indigenous artwork was created by Dixon Patten, proud Yorta Yorta and Gunnai man and Director/Graphic Artist at Bayila Creative. The artwork tells the story of Tweddle’s commitment to Reconciliation with the Aboriginal community. 

  • The ‘U’ shape symbols in the middle depict key people forming the RAP committee and coming together to listen, share and support. 
  • The ripple patterns represent the positive effect on the broader community that the RAP actions will have. 
  • The 2 outreached hands represent the ancestors guiding Tweddle’s RAP journey. 
  • The gum leaves represent being ‘Welcomed to Country’. 
  • The figures holding hands represent children and families supporting, nurturing and protecting each other. 
  • The footprints depict Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people walking together in reconciliation. 
  • The emu and kangaroo tracks are on Australia’s Coat of Arms; chosen because they can’t walk backwards. They are also very paternal and nurture their young. 
  • The pathways lead to different directions and the circles represent the diverse smaller communities that come together to form our big community. 
  • The Boomerangs depict returning to cultural values and principles to inform how we learn and teach each other in the spirit of reconciliation. 

 

 

 


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